Terminological inexactitudes: handy translations of Whitehall jargon (Vol. 18)

Written by Civil Service World on 28 October 2016 in Feature
Feature

Civil Service World's regular guide to the very best in Whitehallese

Final draft
The only version on which anybody provides comments, as they can’t be bothered to look at the five previous drafts

Exciting 
Used to talk up a job that nobody wants to do: “This is an exciting chance for an enthusiastic and driven individual to intentionally poke a hornet’s nest and run away screaming.”

For information
I’m letting you know about this not because I care what you think but so we can share the blame if it goes wrong.

Kick into the long grass
Of course this remains a key government priority. That’s why we want to take an indefinite amount of time to get it right.

Bilateral
Two senior officials having a conversation about something.

To submit your own examples of Whitehallese, email editorial@civilserviceworld.com. Visit ukcivilservant.org for more of the best civil service jargon


More in the series:
Terminological inexactitudes: handy translations of Whitehall jargon (Vol. I)
Terminological inexactitudes: handy translations of Whitehall jargon (Vol. 2)
Terminological inexactitudes: handy translations of Whitehall jargon (Vol. 3)
Terminological inexactitudes: handy translations of Whitehall jargon (Vol. 4)
Terminological inexactitudes: handy translations of Whitehall jargon (Vol. 5)
Terminological inexactitudes: handy translations of Whitehall jargon (Vol. 6)
Terminological inexactitudes: handy translations of Whitehall jargon (Vol. 7)
Terminological inexactitudes: handy translations of Whitehall jargon (Vol. 8)
Terminological inexactitudes: handy translations of Whitehall jargon (Vol. 9)
Terminological inexactitudes: handy translations of Whitehall jargon (Vol. 10)
Terminological inexactitudes: handy translations of Whitehall jargon (Vol. 11)
Terminological inexactitudes: handy translations of Whitehall jargon (Vol. 12)
Terminological inexactitudes: handy translations of Whitehall jargon (Vol. 13)
Terminological inexactitudes: handy translations of Whitehall jargon (Vol. 14)​
Terminological inexactitudes: handy translations of Whitehall jargon (Vol. 15)
Terminological inexactitudes: handy translations of Whitehall jargon (Vol. 16)
Terminological inexactitudes: handy translations of Whitehall jargon (Vol. 17)
Terminological inexactitudes: handy translations of Whitehall jargon (Vol. 18)

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Anonymous (not verified)

Submitted on 30 October, 2016 - 13:45
For information means 'i know you don't care but I am telling you anyway because it is necessary for you to know even if you don't have the sophistication to understand why'

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