Election 2017: Labour would dare smaller parties to vote down Budget plans, says Thornberry

Written by Josh May on 2 June 2017 in News
News

Plan for hung parliament set out as polls show election race tightening

Photo credit: BBC

Labour would introduce a Budget and challenge the SNP, the Liberal Democrats and Greens to risk a Conservative government by voting it down if there is a hung parliament after the election, Emily Thornberry has declared.

The shadow foreign secretary said there would be “no deals” with the smaller parties if no one wins a majority on 8 June.

Her comments, at a campaign event in Basildon, Essex, go much further than Jeremy Corbyn, who has repeatedly refused to categorically rule out an agreement which would see a minority Labour administration propped up by other parties.



Shock analysis by YouGov earlier this week predicted that Britain could be heading for a hung parliament after a surge in Labour support.

Asked if Labour would be prepared to ask Sinn Fein to overturn its self-imposed ban on taking its seats in the Commons in order to secure power, Corbyn would only say: "We’re fighting every constituency to win this election, to form a Labour government. We’re not doing deals, we’re not doing coalitions, we’re not doing any agreements. We are fighting to win this election.”

But Thornberry said: “If we end up with a position where we’re in a minority we will go ahead and we will put forward a Queen’s Speech and a Budget and if people want to vote for it, then good; if they don’t want to vote for it they’re going to have to go back and speak to their constituents and explain to them why it is that we have a Tory government instead.

“But we will be, if we are the largest party, we go ahead – no deals – with our manifesto and with our Budget and with our Queen’s Speech.”

She then turned to Corbyn and said: “That’s the conversations we’ve had, isn’t it? That’s it. No deals.”

The Conservatives have made the prospect of a so-called “coalition of chaos” a central part of their election campaign, claiming a Labour government would have to be propped up by SNP and Liberal Democrat MPs.

Author Display Name
Josh May
About the author

Josh May is news editor of CSW's sister site, PoliticsHome.com, where a version of this story first appeared

Image description
BBC
Share this page
Editor's Pick
Promote as primary content
Not Promoted

Share this page

Further reading in our policy hubs

CONTRIBUTIONS FROM READERS

Please login to post a comment or register for a free account.

Contact the author

The contact details for the Civil Service World editorial team are available on our About Us page.

Related Articles

Related Sponsored Articles

A radical re-think for public sector transformation
2 November 2015

With the ‘low-hanging fruit’ exhausted, the public sector must approach new government saving...

Successful partnerships: working effectively with central government
26 August 2014

TCS is keen to contribute to the topic of successful partnerships between the public and private...