As the PM resigns, which ministers are left in each department?

Some ministries are down to a handful of ministers, following swathes of resignations
The difference a month makes: Then-prime minister Boris Johnson leading a cabinet meeting on 7 June. Photo: PA Images/Alamy Stock Photo

By Tevye Markson

07 Jul 2022

Huge numbers of ministers have resigned in the last 48 hours, leading to Boris Johnson announcing at 12.30pm on Thursday that he will step down as prime minister once a new Tory leader is found.

The situation  which began with the dual resignations of chancellor Rishi Sunak and health secretary Sajid Javid on Tuesday evening – has left some departments with hardly any ministers, with Johnson's attempts to replace them not keeping up with resignations.

Former cabinet secretary Gus O'Donnell said earlier today that the civil service can manage “for a few weeks” without ministers "but it’s absolutely not a good place to be". 

Here is the latest breakdown of how many ministers are left in each department. For the full list of resignations, click here.

Department for Education

Two ministers – four resignations. Cleverly has replaced education minister Michelle Donelan, who resigned from government on Thursday less than 48 hours after she was appointed to replace Nadhim Zahawi, who is now chancellor

James Cleverly, education secretary

Baroness Diana Barran, minister for the school system (unpaid)

Attorney General's Office

One minister– one resignation

Suella Braverman, attorney general

UK Export Finance

One minister – one resignation

Anne-Marie Trevelyan, trade secretary

Treasury

Two ministers – three resignations, including chancellor Rishi Sunak. His replacement, Nadhim Zahawi has called for Johnson to go.

Nadhim Zahawi, chancellor

Lucy Frazer, financial secretary

Wales Office

Two ministers – one resignation (from Welsh secretary Simon Hart, who has been replaced by Robert Buckland)

Robert Buckland, Welsh secretary

David Davies, parliamentary under secretary of state (unpaid)

Northern Ireland Office

Three ministers – one resignation (from secretary of state Brandon Lewis - who has been replaced with Shailesh Vara)

Shailesh Vara, Northern Ireland secretary

Conor Burns, minister for economic and domestic policy; levelling up and innovation;  exploring ways to promote greater community reconciliation and cohesion; constitutional and rights issues; promoting Centenary 2021 and campaign plans for 2022

Lord Jonathan Caine, minister for legacy, new decade, new approach and protocol; reviewing planning for future political negotiations and developing plans to help achieve greater levels of integrated education in Northern Ireland; constitution and rights; legislation and engagement in the House of Lords; aiding political stability; building substantive relationships across sectors and communities through engagement (unpaid)

Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities

Three ministers – four resignations – one sacking (levelling up secretary Michael Gove, replaced by Greg Clark)

Greg Clark, levelling up, housing and communities secretary

Eddie Hughes, minister for rough sleeping and housing

Lord Richard Harrington, minister for refugees (unpaid)

Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport

Three ministers – two resignations

Nadine Dorries, culture secretary

Nigel Huddleston, minister for sport, tourism, heritage and civil society)

Lord Parkinson, minister for arts (unpaid)

Department for Work and Pensions

Four ministers – two resignations

Thérèse Coffey MP, work and pensions secretary

Chloe Smith, minister for disabled people, health and work

David Rutley, minister for welfare delivery

Baroness Deborah Stedman-Scott, minister for work and pensions

Ministry of Justice

Three remain – two resignations – one move (Kit Malthouse, who moves from his joint MoJ-Home Office role to become chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster)

Dominic Raab, justice secretary, lord chancellor and deputy prime minister

Tom Pursglove, minister for justice and tackling illegal migration

Lord Christopher Bellamy, justice minister (unpaid)

Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

Five ministers – two resignations

Kwasi Kwarteng, business secretary

Greg Hands, minister for energy, clean growth and climate change

Paul Scully, minister for small business, consumers and labour markets

Lord Martin Callanan, minister for business, energy and corporate responsibility

Lord Gerry Grimstone, minister for investment (unpaid)

Department of Health and Social Care

Five remain – two resignations, including health secretary Sajid Javid, who was replaced by Steve Barclay

Steve Barclay, health secretary

Gillian Keegan, minister for care and mental health

Maggie Throup, minister for vaccines and public health

Lord Syed Kamall, minister for technology, innovation and life sciences

Maria Caulfield, minister for patient safety and primary care

Department for International Trade

Five remain – one resignation

Anne-Marie Trevelyan, trade secretary

Penny Mordaunt, minister for trade policy

Lord Gerry Grimstone, minister for investment (unpaid)

Ranil Jayawardena, minister for international trade

Mike Freer, minister for exports

Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Four remain – two resignations

George Eustice, environment secretary

Lord Goldsmith, minister for the Pacific and the international environment (unpaid)

Victoria Prentis, minister for farming, fisheries and food)

Lord Richard Benyon, minister for rural affairs, access to nature and biosecurity

Home Office

Seven remain – four resignations – one move (Kit Malthouse, who moves from his joint MoJ-Home Office role to become chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster)

Priti Patel, home secretary

Baroness Susan Williams, minister of state

Kevin Foster MP, minister for safe and legal migration

Tom Pursglove, minister for justice and tackling illegal migration

Lord Stephen Greenhalgh, minister for building safety and fire (unpaid)

Lord Richard Harrington, minister for refugees (unpaid)

Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office

Seven remain – two resignations

Liz Truss, foreign secretary and minister for women and equalities

Amanda Milling, minister for Asia and the Middle East

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon, minister for South and Central Asia, North Africa, United Nations and the Commonwealth

Lord Zac Goldsmith, minister for the Pacific and the international environment (unpaid)

Vicky Ford, minister for Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean

Baroness Deborah Stedman-Scott, minister for women

Cabinet Office

Twelve ministers – zero resignations – one move (Steve Barclay, who became health secretary, replaced by Kit Malthouse)

Boris Johnson, prime minister

Michael Ellis, Cabinet Office minister and paymaster general

Kit Malthouse, chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster

Alok Sharma MP, COP26 president

Mark Spencer, leader of the House of Commons, lord president of the council

Baroness Evans, leader of the House of Lords, lord privy seal

Lord Nicholas True, junior minister

Nigel Adams, minister without portfolio

Andrew Stephenson, minister without portfolio

Leo Docherty, minister for defence people and veterans

Andrew Griffith, minister for policy and head of the prime minister's policy unit (unpaid)

Jacob Rees-Mogg, minister for Brexit opportunities and government efficiency

Heather Wheeler, junior minister (unpaid)

Office of the leader of the House of Commons

Mark Spencer remains

Mark Spencer, leader of the House of Commons, lord president of the council

Office of the Advocate General for Scotland

Keith Stewart remains

Lord Keith Stewart, advocate general for Scotland

Office of the leader of the House of Lords

Both remain

Baroness Natalie Evans, leader of the House of Lords, lord privy seal

Earl Howe, deputy leader of the House of Lords (unpaid)

Scotland Office

Three ministers – zero resignations

Alister Jack, Scotland secretary

Iain Stewart, minister for Scotland

Lord Malcolm Offord, parliamentary under secretary of state (unpaid)

Ministry of Defence

Five ministers – zero resignations

Ben Wallace, defence secretary

Jeremy Quin, minister for defence procurement

Baroness Goldie, minister of state (unpaid)

James Heappey, minister for the armed forces

Leo Docherty, minister for defence people and veterans

Department for Transport

Six ministers – zero resignations

Grant Shapps MP, transport secretary

Andrew Stephenson, minister for HS2, Northern Powerhouse Rail, the Transpennine route upgrade and skills

Wendy Morton, minister of state

Baroness Charlotte Vere, minister for roads, motoring agencies, buses and taxis, light rail and devolution

Robert Courts, minister for aviation, maritime security and civil contingencies

Trudy Harrison, minister for active travel, commercial spaceflight, environment, EU and international transport, future of freight strategy, future of transport, secondary legislation, transport research and science and women’s safety on the transport network

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